¡Updated maps of all places and subjects of the world!
Shares and uses information from other users.

Canning Stock Route

Canning Stock Route

Created by Diane on 11/11/2010
Updated on 15/06/2012
Public map
Streets
Satellite
Hybrid
Physical
Mapnik
Cycle map
Original
Midnight Commander
Red Alert
Streets
Satellite
Hybrid
white
Elements
About this map: 

All locations in this compilation were plotted from positional information shown on topographic and geological maps (the 250K series, that are available on the Internet), and from data available from numerous web pages. All notes and images are as shown on web pages, and references are given for all material used. There are no embedded images; all are network links. This tour is not based on personal experience. For references that ARE based on personal experiences see the listing at the bottom of this page.

All locations in this compilation were plotted from positional information shown on topographic and geological maps (the 250K series, that are available on the Internet), and from data available from numerous web pages. All notes and images are as shown on web pages, and references are given for all material used. There are no embedded images; all are network links. This tour is not based on personal experience. For references that ARE based on personal experiences see the listing at the bottom of this page.

(reference)
"The Canning Stock Route is one of the toughest and most remote tracks in the world. It runs from Wiluna to Halls Creek, both in Western Australia. With a total distance of 1781 km it is also the longest historic stock route in the world. For the first few hundred kilometres of its northern section, it runs concurrent with the Tanami Track.

In the beginning of the 20th century Kimberley cattlemen were looking for a way to traverse the western deserts of Australia with their cattle. Between 1906 and 1910 Alfred Canning surveyed the route and sunk a total of 52 wells. The route was used for the first time in 1911, but all the cattlemen were killed by Aborigines along the way.

Canning's party constructed the wells with the forced help of Aboriginal people whose land the route traversed, the Mardu. Canning himself found it difficult to locate desert water sources. In order to gain Mardu assistance in locating water along the route, Canning captured several Mardu men, chained them by the neck, forced them to eat salt, and then waited until they got thirsty enough to lead his party to a native well.

Before 1930 the route was not used regularly. This changed after the improvement of the wells, and between 1930 and 1950 it was used on a fairly regular basis.

In 1973 (before the route was successfully negotiated in four-wheel drives) an ambitious attempt to complete it on foot took place. Two English brothers, John and Peter Waterfall and a New Zealander, Murray Rankin, fashioned home made carts from bicycle tyres and metal tubing, and began their attempt. Although one of the brothers (John) turned back, Peter and Murray continued to Lake Disappointment, before returning to a food drop they had left along the route. They took 2 months to complete their trek. Murray Rankin eventually succeeded with an attempt assisted by a food drop. In 1968 the entire length of the track was driven for the first time. During the 1980s fuel dumps were created and adventurous travellers became interested in the history of the track and the challenge to drive it.

Today, whilst quite a few travellers successfully make the trip, it still requires substantial planning and a convoy of well-equipped four-wheel drives or equivalent vehicles, and is only practical during the cooler months. Fuel drops typically need to be organised in advance."

Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canning_Stock_Route
Some more references :

-- Diamantina Tours -- A very useful description of the Canning Stock route http://www.exploroz.com/iMapPlot/Utils/getPlotSwapImage.asp?tp=235

Comentarios

There are no comments yet. Be the first to participate
Leave your comment
To leave a comment you must be a register user
Already a member?
Don't have an account yet?
Are you new at Ikimap?